44 Adverbs – Degree

Adverbs

Adverbs are expressions that function as modifiers of other elements in the clause. They can provide a wide range of information.

Those used to provide information about the intensity of an action or adjective are called Adverbs of Degree or Intensifiers.

Adverbs of Degree are used as intensifiers. Below you can read the main ones in ascending order:

  • Almost
  • Too
  • Quite
  • Extremely
  • Fully
  • Very

In some cases adverbs can be formed by adding -ly to adjectives.

  • Your dinner is almost ready.
  • Her dress was too small for me.
  • This job is quite interesting.
  • I was extremely tired after the trek.
  • Our office is fully furnished.
  • You look very beautiful tonight.

In some cases adverbs can be formed by adding -ly to adjectives.

Adverbs are usually positioned after the auxiliary verbs “to be” or “to have” (“I’m rarely at home”) and before other verbs (I rarely go to the dentist):

  • Almost (nearly, not yet);
  • Too (more than it should be);
  • Quite (enough);
  • Extremely (to a very great degree);
  • Fully (no less or fewer than);
  • Very (in a high degree).

Adverbs are important as they modify other elements in a sentence. Adverbs giving information about the intensity of an action or adjective are called Adverbs of Degree (or Intensifiers).

The main Adverbs of Degree are: Almost, too, quite, extremely, fully and very.

For example:
— “I’m extremely confused.” = In this case the action is expressed by a the verb to be, so the adverb is positioned after it (verb to be + adverb).

NOTE: When we have an auxiliary verb in a sentence (to be or to have), adverbs are placed after this verb and before with any other verbs.

Let’s revise this content within the [Form] section. Take a look at the [Example] section that show its use within a context.