Comparisons with “Like”

The Comparative is a structure used to make a comparison between two things, people or actions, expressing the equalities or inequalities between them.

We can use the preposition like to make a comparison between two similar or identical things or ideas.

This kind of comparison usually has this structure:
First element of comparison + like + second element of comparison.

  • Your house looks like my mother’s house.
  • This boy cleans like a robot.
  • Those student apartments look like garbage.

We use like to compare two things that are similar or identical and we usually place it before nouns or pronouns.

We use the Comparative to make a comparison between two things, people or actions, expressing the equalities or inequalities between them.

We can use the preposition “like” to make a comparison between two similar or identical things or ideas. The structure we use for this type of comparison is:
First element of comparison + like + second element of comparison (e.g. The kitchen smells like flowers.).

For example:
“The kitchen smells like flowers.” = Like helps us to make a comparison between two similar things, smell of the kitchen and flowers.

Let’s revise this content within the [Form] section. Take a look at the [Example] section that shows its use within a context.