Present Perfect – Yet, Just, Already

Adverbs

Yet, Just, Already and Still are Adverbs which can be used with the Present Perfect and function as modifiers of other elements in the clause, providing a wide range of information.

Each one of these Adverbs has its specific and fixed position in a Present Perfect sentence. This position is different for each adverb and it’s important to remember it in order to use it correctly.

Yet

Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” (negative) + past participle + complement + yet.

Just

Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” + just + past participle + complement.

Already

Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” + already + past participle + complement.

Still

Subject + still + auxiliary verb “to have” (negative) + past participle + complement.

* “has” for the third person singular

Yet

  • I haven’t sent my CV yet.
  • He hasn’t come yet.
  • Haven’t they sent an email yet?

Just

  • I have just finished.
  • She has just retired.
  • Have they just sent a fax?

Already

  • I have already finished.
  • He has already booked his ticket.
  • Have you already planned something for tonight?

Still

  • I still haven’t made any plan for Christmas.
  • He still has not done anything all day.
  • Have you still not done the laundry?

We use Yet in negative statements to say that an imminent event will not happen in the present but will in the future. It is used in question to ask if the imminent event has happened (=until now).

We use Just in affirmative statements to say that an event happened shortly before that moment in the recent past (=short before).

We use Already in affirmative statements and questions to say that an event happened in the past and will not happen again in the present or in the future (=by now).

We use Still in negative statements and questions to say that an event has not finished or has lasted longer than object expected. (=continuing to happen)

Adverbs act as modifiers of other elements in a clause and this happens when we use the Present Perfect with: Yet, Just, Already and Still.

The positions of the Adverbs are all different when creating a sentence:

  • Yet: Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” + not + past participle + complement + yet;
  • Just: Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” + just + past participle + complement;
  • Already: Subject + auxiliary verb “to have” + already + past participle + complement;
  • Still: Subject + still + auxiliary verb “to have” + not + past participle + complement.

For example:
— “I haven’t arrived home yet.” = The action has not happened in the past or present because it is going to happen in the near future. (=until now)
— “I have just arrived home.” = The action happened in the near past. (=short before)
— “I have already arrived home.” = The action happened in the past and will not happen again. (=by now)
“I still haven’t arrived home.” =  The action has not finished. (=continuing to happen)

NOTE: Some of the Adverbs are only used in negative statements and not in positive ones (and vice versa).

Let’s revise this content within the [Form] section. Take a look at the [Example] section that shows its use within a context.