- English Grammar B1 Level - https://open.books4languages.com/english-b1-grammar -

Adverbial Subordinate Clauses

Introduction

Adverbs are words that function as modifiers of sentences, clauses or various elements of clauses. They can provide a wide range of information. 

Adverbial subordinate clauses are word combinations that act like an adverb. They are dependent clauses.

Form

Adverbial subordinate clauses are dependent clauses formed by word cobinations that act like an adverb. They go before the main clause separated by a comma (,), or after the main clause without comma.

The structure is:
Adverb clause + (,) + main clause…
Main clause + adverb clause…

The words we use to introduce them are:

  1. For time: as soon as, before, by the time, once, soon, until, when, whenever, while;
  2. For placehere, there, wherever;
  3. For purposeas a result, consequrntly, hence, in order to, therefore, thus;
  4. For cause: as, as much as, because, if, since.

Example

  1. Whenever there is a clinic, there will be doctors as well.
    The full fat milk is finished whenever I go to the supermarket.
  2. Wherever I go, I bump into people that I know.
    I order chicken breast wherever I go for dinner.
  3. In order to have a successful business, you need to hire professionals.
    He underwent surgery in order to remove the cancer.
  4. If you run too fast, you will twist your ankle.
    You will need to take a spoon if you want to eat the soup.

Use

We use adverbial subordinate clauses to give information about time, place, purpose, and cause of an action.

Summary

Adverbial subordinate clauses are dependent clauses formed by word combinations that act like an adverb.

We use adverb clauses to give information about time (before, soon, when…), place (here, there, wherever), purpose (consequently, in order to, thus), and cause (because, if, since) of an action.

We start with and adverb clause followed by a comma and the main clause. We can also start with the main clause followed by an adverb clause (we don’t use a comma here).

For example:
— “If you run too fast, you will twist your ankle.” = The adverb clause is introduced by if to express the cause of the action.
— “He underwent surgery in order to remove the cancer.” = The adverb clause is introduced by in order toto express the purpose of the action and it is positioned after the main clause.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.