- English Grammar B2 Level - https://open.books4languages.com/english-b2-grammar -

Future Continuous for Prediction

Introduction

The future continuous tense is used to talk about actions that will be in progress in the future. {see Future Continuous [1], B1 level}

We use the future continuous tense for different purposes. One of them is for making predictions and guessing about future events.

Form

{See Future Continuous [1], B1 level}

Example

  • Every day you say you won’t be eating Turkish cuisine and then you do.
  • He will be coming here to paint the walls.
  • Will she be preparing dinner for us tomorrow?
  • We won’t be having a day off on Friday.
  • They will be cutting a lot of trees down.

Use

We use future continuous to talk about future events that we think will happen, or that are already decided.

Summary

We can use the future continuous tense to make predictions and guesses about new events. {see Future Continuous [1], B1 level}

We can use it in its different forms:

  • Affirmative: We start with the subject followed by will be and a verb that ends with -ing.
  • Negative: We start with the subject followed by will not be and a verb that ends with -ing.
  • Interrogative: We start with will followed by the subject and be and a verb that ends with -ing (the sentence ends with a question mark).

For example:
“Doctors believe that you will be giving birth tomorrow at this hour.” = Doctors predict that during this time of the following day, the pregnant woman may be giving birth.
“Doctors believe that you will give birth tomorrow.” = We use the future simple [2] to express a prediction of the finished action and not the ongoing one.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

RELATED

Future continuous can be used to make predictions and guesses about new events. You can also talk about predictions, beliefs, or intentions in future simple. [2] Learn more about the Future continuous [1], at B1 level.

In English, you can learn more about the continuous structures, at A1 level, in Present continuous [3].