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Unit 1.2

Present Perfect with Time Adverbs

Adverbs

Adverbs are expressions that function as modifiers of other elements in the clause. They can provide a wide range of information.

Time adverbs are often used with the present perfect and function as modifiers of other elements in the clause.

The main time adverbs that are used with the present perfect are: already, just, still and yet.

Their positions in sentences are:

  • AlreadySubject + auxiliary verb + already + past participle + …
  • JustSubject + auxiliary verb + just + past participle + …
  • StillSubject + auxiliary verb + still + verb + …
  • Yet: Subject + verb + … + yet

NOTE: They can have different positions when are not used with perfect tenses.

Positive statements

  • She has just retired.
  • He has already booked his ticket.
  • Have they just sent a fax?

Negative statements

  • I still haven’t made any plan for Christmas.
  • Have you still not done the laundry?
  • Haven’t they sent an email yet?

Adverbs of time express when an action happened, for how long and how often. The main adverbs of time are:

  • Already is used to say that something has happened early, or earlier than expected.
  • Just is used  to express an action happened at this moment or a short time ago.
  • Still  is used to express an action that has not finished or has lasted longer than expected.
  • Yet used to say that something is not happening now, but it will happen in the short future.

 

When adverbs are used with present perfect, they can act as modifiers of other elements in a clause.

Their position in sentences are:

  • AlreadySubject + auxiliary verb + already + past participle + …
  • JustSubject + auxiliary verb + just + past participle + …
  • StillSubject + auxiliary verb + still + verb + …
  • Yet: Subject + verb + … + yet

For example:
— “I have already arrived home.” = The action happened in the past and will not happen again (by now).
— “I have just arrived home.” = The action happened in the near past (short before).
“I still haven’t arrived home.” =  The action has not finished (continuing to happen).
— “I haven’t arrived home yet.” = The action has not happened in the past or present because it is going to happen in the near future (until now).

NOTE: Some of the adverbs are only used in negative statements and not in positive ones (and vice versa). Moreover, they can have different positions when are not used with perfect tenses.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

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