- English Grammar B2 Level - https://open.books4languages.com/english-b2-grammar -

Adverbs of Attitude

Introduction

Adverbs are expressions that function as modifiers of other elements in the clause. They can provide a wide range of information. {see Adverbs of Frequency [1], A1 level}

Adverbs of attitude express the speaker’s attitude towards an action. They are generally used to refer to whole sentences and not to small phrases or words.

Form

The position of adverbs of attitude is quite flexible.

We can put them:

  • At the beginning of the sentences;
  • At the end of the sentences;
  • Before a verb.

The most commonly used attitude adverbs are: certainly, clearly, frankly, fortunately, honestly, hopefully, incredibly, naturally, obviously, really, simply, surprisingly…

NOTE: Most of attitude adverbs can also function as manner adverbs [2]; it depends on how the adverb is used in the sentence.

Example

  • Frankly, I feel tired so I don’t want to come with you.
  • Doctors healed the wound of the patient, fortunately.
  • He simply didn’t want to make it happen.
  • We were surprisingly glad to see her in the wedding ceremony.
  • The side effects of the pill hopefully were weak.

Use

We use attitude adverbs to give information about the speaker’s feelings about a situation being described.

Summary

Adverbs of attitude express the speaker’s attitude towards an action that is being described. Generally, they refer to whole sentences and not to small phrases or words.

They can be used at the beginning of a sentence, at the end of it, or before a verb.

The most commonly used are: certainly, clearly, frankly, fortunately, honestly, hopefully, incredibly, naturally, obviously, really, simply, suprisingly…

For example:
Honestly, I don’t think he will win the competition.” = The speaker wants to put emphasis to his/her opinion about a situation.
“He won the competition, surprisingly.” = The speaker expresses a feeling of surprise because of an action he/she didn’t expect.
“He will clearly win the competition”  = The speaker wants to express confidence about a situation.
“I can see him clearly now.” = Here, clearly is an adverb of manner [2], as it emphasises the way something is done, which is without any obstruction.

NOTE: Most of attitude adverbs can also function as manner adverbs; it depends on how the adverb is used in the sentence.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.