- English Grammar B2 Level - https://open.books4languages.com/english-b2-grammar -

So and Such

Introduction

Adverbs are words that functions as modifiers of other elements of a clause.

So and such are used to emphasise feelings or opinions.

Form

The adverbs so and such don’t have a fixed position in a sentence, but they come before an adjective or adverb.

The structure for so and such, as exclamatory sentences, is:
…so + adjective/adverb + that* + …
….such + (a/an) + adjective + noun + that* + …

*That is optional, it doesn’t change the meaning of a sentence.

Example

  • I took a taxi to save time but it was driving so slowly.
  • The food she had at midnight was so unpleasant (that) she could not eat it.
  • The food was served on such a beautiful plate and in such a short time.
  • He is such a successful man! He always achieves his goals.
  • The teacher gave students such a short period to study for the exam (that) it was almost impossible for them to study all the material.

Use

We can use so and such [1] to emphasise actions, feelings, opinions:

  • So: very, highly;
  • Such: very, great.

Summary

So and such are adverbs used to emphasise feelings or opinions. So means very, highly; such means very, great.

The adverbs so and such don’t have a fixed position in a sentence, but they come before an adjective or adverb.

The use of that is optional, it doesn’t change the meaning of a sentence.

For example:
— “They were so busy that they had to wake up in the early hours of the morning.” = So emphasises how busy they are.
— “He was gone for such a long time that we thought they had gotten lost.” = Such highlights the fact that he was away for a really long time.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.