Unit 9.1

Concessive Clauses – 2

Complex Clauses - 2 minutes

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Introduction

A concessive clause is usually a subordinate clause that expresses a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Form

Concessive clause usually follow the concessive conjunctions even if, in spite of/despite of, notwithstanding, whereas, while and yet.

The positions of a concessive clause in the sentence are:
Main clause + Concessive Conjunction + Concessive Clause
Concessive Conjunction + Concessive Clause + Comma (,) + Main clause

Example

  1. They want to learn how to bake brownies even if it is complicated.
  2. We went for tapas in spite of/despite the rain.
  3. She ate the meal notwithstanding its horrible taste.
  4. I prefer light meals whereas my dad prefers heavy meals.
  5. He ate fried fish while his wife ate grilled chicken.
  6. Her suggestion for a group game was interesting, yet nobody had the energy to participate.

Use

We use concessive clauses to show a contrast between two events or situations.

Before concessive clauses, we use the conjunctions:

  1. Even if, meaning without being influenced by;
  2. In spite of/despite of, meaning without being affected by;
  3. Notwithstanding, meaning without being determined by;
  4. Whereas, meaning compared with the fact that;
  5. While, meaning during the time an event occurs;
  6. Yet, meaning still, until now (present time).

NOTE: Usually, after the first situation, the second situation is unexpected.

Summary

Concessive clauses are subordinate clauses which express a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Concessive clause usually follow the concessive conjunctions even if, in spite of/despite of, notwithstanding, whereas, while and yet.

We start with the main clause followed by a concessive conjuction and a concessive clause (we don’t use a comma here). We can also start with a concessive conjuction followed by a concessive clause, a comma and the main clause.

For example:
“I had to go to work even though I was sick.” = I was sick but I had to go to work anyway.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

Exercise

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