Unit 9.1

Concessive Clauses – Part 2


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Introduction

A concessive clause is usually a subordinate clause that expresses a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Form

Concessive clauses usually follow the concessive conjunctions even if, in spite of/despite of, notwithstanding, whereas, while and yet.

The concessive clause can go before or after the main clause in the following way:
Main clause + concessive conjunction + concessive clause
Concessive conjunction + concessive clause + Comma (,) + main clause

Example

  1. Even if it is complicated, they want to learn how to bake brownies
  2. Despite the rain, we went for a walk. 
  3. Notwithstanding its horrible taste, she ate all her meal. 
  4. I prefer light meals whereas my dad prefers heavy meals.
  5. He ate fried fish while his wife ate grilled chicken.
  6. Her suggestion for a group game was interesting, yet nobody had the energy to participate.

Use

We use concessive clauses to show a contrast between two events or situations.

Before concessive clauses, we use the conjunctions:

  1. even if, meaning without being influenced by;
  2. en spite of/despite of, meaning without being affected by;
  3. notwithstanding, meaning without being determined by;
  4. whereas, meaning compared with the fact that;
  5. while, meaning during the time an event occurs;
  6. yet, meaning still, until now (present time).

NOTE: Usually, after the first situation, the second situation is unexpected.

Summary

Concessive clauses are subordinate clauses which express a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Concessive clause usually follow the concessive conjunctions even if, in spite of/despite of, notwithstanding, whereas, while and yet.

We start with the main clause followed by a concessive conjuction and a concessive clause (we do not use a comma here). We can also start with a concessive conjuction followed by a concessive clause, a comma and the main clause.

For example:
“I had to go to work even though I was sick.” = I was sick but I had to go to work anyway.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

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