Unit 9.1

Concessive Clauses – Part 1

Introduction

A concessive clause is usually a subordinate clause that expresses a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Form

Concessive clauses usually follow the concessive conjunctions although, even though or though.

The concessive clause can go before or after the main clause in the following way:
Main clause + concessive conjunction + concessive clause;
Concessive conjunction + concessive clause + comma (,) + main clause.

NOTE: We cannot use though at the beginning of a sentence.

Example

  • I’ll come to the party although I may be late. 
    Although this is a modern city, it has many historical monuments.
  • I went to school even though I wasn’t feeling well.
    Even though this is a university city, you can see many old people here.
  • The essay was interesting, though she got a low mark.

Use

We use although, even though and though to express the opposite idea to what is stated in the main clause. They all mean: despite the fact that, in spite of the fact that.

Summary

Concessive clauses are subordinate clauses which express a contrast with the concept formulated in the main clause.

Concessive clauses usually follow the concessive conjunctons although, even though or though. They all mean: despite, the fact that, in spite of the fact that.

We start with the main clause followed by a concessive conjuction and a concessive clause (we don’t use a comma here). We can also start with a concessive conjuction followed by a concessive clause, a comma and the main clause.

For example:
“I don’t like fish although I will try this food.” / Although I don’t like fish, I will try this food.” = The fact that I will try this food is in contrast with the fact that I don’t like fish.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. And take a look to the {Example} that show its use within a context.

Exercises


Translations

License