Unit 10.2

Prepositional Verbs

Verbs

Prepositional verbs are the result of the combination of prepositions and verbs in a sentence.

A prepositional verb is every verb followed by a preposition.

Prepositional verbs consist of a verb and a preposition. They always have an object immediately after the preposition, which acts as a connection between the verb and its object. After this preposition usually follows a noun or a pronoun that make prepositional verbs to be transitive. Prepositional verbs do not take the particle movement rule.

Prepositional phrases have this structure:
… + verb + preposition + object + …

The most commonly used prepositions with verbs are: about, at, for, from, in, of, on, with

Examples of prepositional verbs are: agree with, beg for, believe in, laugh atlisten to, look at, remind of, wait forworry about

  • She is knocking at the door of the post office.
  • They aren’t laughing at me.
  • I have to send him a fax. Could you remind me of that later?
The definition of a prepositional verb in some cases can be at variance from the significance of the two parts taken apart.

Prepositional verbs are the combination of the prepositions and other elements of the sentence. A prepositional verb is every verb followed by a preposition.

The most commonly used prepositions with verbs are: about, at, for, from, in, of, on, with

Examples of prepositional verbs are: agree with, believe in, look at, remind of, wait forworry about

They have this structure:
… + verb + preposition + object + …

For example:
— “He waits for their answer every day.” / He waits their answer every day.” / He waits their answer for every day.”

NOTE: Some adverbs can be used as prepositions too. Mentioned distinction could be found in dictionaries.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

 

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