Unit 10.2

Prepositional Verbs

Verbs

Prepositional verbs are the result of the combination of prepositions and verbs in a sentence.

A prepositional verb is every verb followed by a preposition.

Prepositional verbs consist of a verb and a preposition. They always have an object immediately after the preposition and the preposition acts as a connector between the verb and the object (usually a noun or a pronoun) that makes prepositional verbs to be transitive. Prepositional verbs do not take the particle movement rule.

Prepositional phrases have this structure:
… + verb + preposition + object + …

The most commonly used prepositions with verbs are: about, at, for, from, in, of, on, with

Examples of prepositional verbs are: agree with, beg for, believe in, laugh atlisten to, look at, remind of, wait forworry about

  • She is knocking at the door of the post office.
  • They aren’t laughing at me.
  • I have to send him a fax. Could you remind me of that later?
A prepositional verb as a whole can have a meaning that does not correspond to the two parts separately.

A prepositional verb is every verb followed by a preposition after which follows a noun or a pronoun.

The most commonly used prepositions with verbs are: about, at, for, from, in, of, on, with

Examples of prepositional verbs are: agree with, believe in, look at, remind of, wait forworry about

For example:
— “He waits for their answer every day.” / He waits their answer every day.” / He waits their answer for every day.”

NOTE: Some adverbs can be used as prepositions too. Mentioned distinction could be found in dictionaries.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

 

License

English Grammar A2 Level Copyright © 2018 by books4languages. All Rights Reserved.