Unit 7.1

Causal Clauses

Complex Clauses

Causal clauses express the cause or the reason of the main clause.

Due to and owing to have similar meanings, they both introduce the reason of the action happening in the main clause.

They have the following structure:
Main clause [result] + due to + noun/-ing form + …
Main clause [result] + owing to + noun/-ing form + …

NOTE: Due to and owing to are used at the beginning of the sentence as long as they are followed by a noun phrase.

  • He couldn’t pass the course due to/owing to his low marks.
    Due to/owing to his low marks, he couldn’t pass the course.
  • Owing to/due to breaking the overhead projector, Mark was punished.
    Mark was punished owing to/due to breaking the overhead projector.

We use due to and owing to to express reasons.

We use them before the reason of the situation of the main clause. They have the same meaning of because of and on account of.

Causal clauses express the cause or the reason of the main clause.

Due to and owing to have similar meanings, they are both followed by a reason. They share similar meanings with because of and on account of.

Due to and owing to share the following structure:
Main clause [result] + due to + noun/-ing form + …
Main clause [result] + owing to + noun/-ing form + …

Due to and owing to share the following structure: We start with the main clause followed by due to or owing to and a gerund or a noun.

For example:
Due to his discriminatory behaviour, the professor was fired.” = Due to introduces the reason why the professor was fired.
“He doesn’t have a lifelong friend owing to his ambitions.” = Owing to explains the reason why he doesn’t have a lifelong friend.

NOTE: Due to and owing to can be used at the beginning of the sentence as long as they are followed by a nominal phrase.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

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