Unit 6.1

Imperative in Passive Voice

Verbs

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Introduction

Imperative clauses are used when people tell someone else to do something (an advice, a suggestion, a request, a command…).

These clauses can be made passive by using the passive formula as well.
{See Passive Structure, B1 level }

Form

We form passive imperatives by using the auxiliary verb to be after the subject.

We can also use the verb let at the beginning of the sentence, before objects.

The affirmative form of the passive imperative is:

  • Subject + be + past participle of verb + …
  • Let + object + be + past participle + …

The negative form of the passive imperative is:

  • Subject + be + not + past participle of verb + …
  • Let + object + not + be + past participle + …

Example

  • You are ordered to move away from the car.
  • You are not requested to exercise more.
  • All customers are invited to donate to this organisation and show their generosity..
  • Let all the horses be freed.
  • Let them be lost.
  • Let people not be constantly manipulated.

Use

Passive imperative is not so common in daily language.

NOTE: Just like emphatic imperatives, we can use you in order to emphasize our sentence.

Summary

Imperative can be used in passive voice by using the passive formula of the verb.

Its structure in the affirmative form is:

  • We start with the subject of the sentence followed by the auxiliary verb to be, the past participle of the verb and then the rest of the sentence.
  • We can also start with the verb let, followed by the object, the auxiliary verb to be, the past participle of the verb and then the rest of the sentence.

Its structure in the negative form is:

  • We start with the subject of the sentence followed by the auxiliary verb to be, the adverb not, the past participle of the verb and then the rest of the sentence.
  • We can also start with the verb let, followed by the object, the adverb not, the auxiliary verb to be, the past participle of the verb and then the rest of the sentence.

For example:
— Let all the people be treated equally!”
— “Let the window not be opened.”

NOTE: Just like emphatic imperatives, we can use you in order to emphasize our sentence.

For example:
— “You are requested to be silent.”

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

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