Unit 6.1



Subject in Imperative sentences

Syntax

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Introduction

Imperative clauses are used when people tell someone else to do something (an advice, a suggestion, a request, a command…).

The Subject in the imperative clauses is always the same (you).

Form

The subject, in imperative sentences, is always you.

We can indicate the receiver by using a noun or a pronoun.

Example

  • Be at the destination point at 6.30 am. (You)
  • Guys! Meet me at the classroom after the break for a puzzle game.
  • Sir cancel the show. The artist is sick.
  • You! Follow the line immediately.
  • Soldiers! Hurry up! (You)

Use

In imperative sentences, you is the subject all the time because imperative sentences always address someone or something.

We can also use you as a subject to show emphatic anger and persuasion.

Summary

In imperative sentences, you is the subject all the time because imperative sentences always address someone or something. We can also use you as a subject to show emphatic anger and persuasion.

We can indicate the receiver by using a noun or a pronoun.

For example:
— “Tell me the truth about Anne.” (You)
Guys, look at this!” (You)
— You! Stop making noise during the lesson.” = We show ephatic anger by using you as a subject.
♦ You shouldn’t make noise during a lesson.” = We can’t use the imperative when we use the generic pronoun you, as it refers to all people in general.

Let’s revise this content within the {Form} section. Take a look at the {Example} section that shows its use within a context.

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